Psyreviews RIP?

General Discussion about the PsyTrance scene, way of life, etc.
70 posts Page 1 of 3
psyllium
Posts: 1044
Joined: Sat Oct 11, 2003 6:01 pm


LOR....

http://www.psyreviews.net/

Image

That's it for psyreviews.

We may return if the music gets seriously good again.

 

phatpat
Posts: 336
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 8:25 pm


havent seen that site before... i like to use www.psynews.org
Gora
Posts: 466
Joined: Mon Jun 19, 2006 8:40 am


psyllium wrote :
LOR....

http://www.psyreviews.net/

Image

That's it for psyreviews.

We may return if the music gets seriously good again.



Sad but true...................!!!!!
SYNeR
Posts: 346
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2006 12:07 am


Gora wrote :
Sad but true...................!!!!!


Yea, I'm finding it true.. I've only been listening to psy from around the end of 2005, but I've found myself constantly gravitating towards older releases over newer releases..

It seems these days, I have enough trouble finding an album with even 2-3 tracks on it I like.. Maybe I'm just picky or not looking hard enough for the good stuff.

 

raptor
Posts: 1483
Joined: Wed Dec 26, 2001 4:51 am


if psytrance is so shithouse why do people still go to parties.. music gets released.. people/djs still buying it (and downloading it).. and people still trying to make it?

the issue is that the artists who have alot of experience are just over it... every second producer ive been speaking with lately all have fucking electro or minimal projects that they think will make them more money or get them more well known... so all that is left (generally speaking) are newer producers... so DONT GIVE THEM SHIT for making psytrance..

 

simon
Posts: 2944
Joined: Fri Dec 28, 2001 8:33 pm


Raptor wrote :
so all that is left (generally speaking) are newer producers... so DONT GIVE THEM SHIT for making psytrance..


if they were making psytrance they wouldnt get shit.

 

FeralBrown
Posts: 5944
Joined: Wed Aug 28, 2002 2:26 pm


simon wrote :
Raptor wrote :
so all that is left (generally speaking) are newer producers... so DONT GIVE THEM SHIT for making psytrance..


if they were making psytrance they wouldnt get shit.


LOM...
too true...
I think parties (the "scene"?!) still keep kicking on because people wanna take drux without the threat of society breathing down their neck. Nothing to do with psy, and particularly with good, innovative psy.
I also think Damian has been more than generous with the expiry date.

 

ALEXUP
Posts: 833
Joined: Wed Jun 07, 2006 8:07 pm


Something Died... Maybe it was the inspiration..

 

raptor
Posts: 1483
Joined: Wed Dec 26, 2001 4:51 am


FeralBrown wrote :
simon wrote :
Raptor wrote :
so all that is left (generally speaking) are newer producers... so DONT GIVE THEM SHIT for making psytrance..


if they were making psytrance they wouldnt get shit.


LOM...
too true...
I think parties (the "scene"?!) still keep kicking on because people wanna take drux without the threat of society breathing down their neck. Nothing to do with psy, and particularly with good, innovative psy.
I also think Damian has been more than generous with the expiry date.


I see people going to psytrance parties/festivals and hearing psytrance, liking what they hear and experience - granted they may not think every set they hear is to their tastes but enjoying some of the music heard none the less.

*shrug*

 

psyllium
Posts: 1044
Joined: Sat Oct 11, 2003 6:01 pm


Raptor wrote :
I see people going to psytrance parties/festivals and hearing psytrance, liking what they hear and experience - granted they may not think every set they hear is to their tastes but enjoying some of the music heard none the less.

*shrug*


I have to agree here... there is such a wide variation now that you won't find many people going to a party and loving every single set from every DJ or artist.

Psy isn't really dead yet... It's just a bit more elusive :)

 

ALEXUP
Posts: 833
Joined: Wed Jun 07, 2006 8:07 pm


psyllium wrote :
Raptor wrote :
I see people going to psytrance parties/festivals and hearing psytrance, liking what they hear and experience - granted they may not think every set they hear is to their tastes but enjoying some of the music heard none the less.

*shrug*


I have to agree here... there is such a wide variation now that you won't find many people going to a party and loving every single set from every DJ or artist.

Psy isn't really dead yet... It's just a bit more elusive :)


Psy is not dead at all.



People's taste change.... People get "Jaded" People wake the fuck up. But the music never changed it only died in your heart. :love:

 

itchytriggerniggerfingers
Posts: 2288
Joined: Wed May 17, 2006 9:39 pm


psyllium wrote :
Psy isn't really dead yet... It's just a bit more elusive :)



I heard psytrance once. Well, at least I think I did :wink:

 

simon
Posts: 2944
Joined: Fri Dec 28, 2001 8:33 pm


I hardly ever hear anything that i consider to be psychedelic at a party. Sure, i like a lot of what i hear, but to label it as "psychedelic" is misleading at best. I admit i dont go to parties that often anymore, but the only times in the last few years i have actually found myself trancing out like the old days and thinking "fuck me that music is trippy!" has been to a23, gappeq (and i dont even like darkpsy) , hedonix, antix, ghettafunkt...

A phat beat and some delayed, reverbed sounds do not make something psychedelic. in fact i often argue most progressive "trance" is just house music pitched up, and some of the latest "psy morning music" i have heard is nu-wave happy hardcore to my ears. hell, i pretty much play heavy techno now (very badly it seems :oops: ). Even suomi sound is getting a bit predictable and formula based - and something predictable is not psychedelic . I rekon if you could get a plug in that removes vocals, and ran it on some Nu-NRG you wouldnt be able to tell the difference between the result and some of the latest round of "psytrance".

im not saying it doesn't exist - i just dont think its made as often (and therefore not played as often) as people think. I think we've gotten used to sub standard music. When a truly psychedelic album comes out, just about everyone likes it. Like Tea Chairz, or a giiwa release, the gus till cd, the dimension 5 re-release, some darkpsy is like this, some prog is like this. but this music is in the minority. the majority is inbred, dull, lifeless "paint by numbers" music.

the majority of artists that damion gave shit to wrote shit. Alien Project is not psychedelic. the only thing psychedelic about dali is how some people think her music is psychedelic. skazi,... well. hahaha. but when he says something is psychedelic, you can pretty much be sure it is.

of course, this is all my opinion, and nothing more...

 

FeralBrown
Posts: 5944
Joined: Wed Aug 28, 2002 2:26 pm


^What he said.

Going to festivals and having a good dance to "psy" is not the same as being able to listen to and appreciate mind-blowing psychedelic trance music.

 

tripn
Posts: 6721
Joined: Mon Aug 05, 2002 5:28 pm


damiens reviews were on the mark 9 times out of 10 and even when i disagreed with him they were still very funny to read. i was told recently that he actually made raja ram cry with one of his reviews of a TIP release. lol, poor raj.

anyway, in regards to the state of psytrance, i dont think its dead by a long shot. there is always a certain amount of quality releases coming out even though the amount of shithouse generic music is always 20 times greater and it seems always on the increase. just have a look on the main page of saikosounds and youll find yourself wading through a whole bunch of crap that sounds the same in order to find something original or something with substance (and lui im not just talking about spasticbeat hehe). anyway as long as there is a certain amount of decent music around then you can always just ignore the rest.

the main thing that annoys the fuck out of me more than anything is when good artists who created a new sound for themselves, pioneered the genre or added something creative to it, end up changing their sound to something that is completely generic and end up shelfing themselves into one category or another and just generally going from unique to boring. its no longer the case that you can simply buy an artists new album based on their previous albums having been amazing works of art. these artists piss me off much more than the ones who are just a disgrace to begin with such dali, hypersonic, etc.

 

itchytriggerniggerfingers
Posts: 2288
Joined: Wed May 17, 2006 9:39 pm


tripn wrote :
anyway, in regards to the state of psytrance, i dont think its dead by a long shot. there is always a certain amount of quality releases coming out even though the amount of shithouse generic music is always 20 times greater and it seems always on the increase. just have a look on the main page of saikosounds and youll find yourself wading through a whole bunch of crap that sounds the same in order to find something original or something with substance (and lui im not just talking about spasticbeat hehe). anyway as long as there is a certain amount of decent music around then you can always just ignore the rest.



Gotta sort through the chaff to find the wheat :)


the main thing that annoys the fuck out of me more than anything is when good artists who created a new sound for themselves, pioneered the genre or added something creative to it, end up changing their sound to something that is completely generic and end up shelfing themselves into one category or another and just generally going from unique to boring. its no longer the case that you can simply buy an artists new album based on their previous albums having been amazing works of art. these artists piss me off much more than the ones who are just a disgrace to begin with such dali, hypersonic, etc.



Totally. Nothing worse than buying the artists latest album & hearing complete shite when their previous album was gold. :twisted:

 

raptor
Posts: 1483
Joined: Wed Dec 26, 2001 4:51 am


Taken from http://www.trance.edu/drupal/node/29 with full list of references at the bottom

Trance Inducing Music - 2007

Dennis R. Wier
Director, The Trance Institute, Bruetten, Switzerland

This is a brief and simplified overview of trance inducing music, since the word trance is closely associated with the musical genre. There is a connection between trance theory and the musical genre 'trance music' or 'techno trance' as well as the trance inducing music of shamans of Africa, Central and South America and other areas. Moreover, ritual music of many western and eastern cultures has trance inducing aspects which can be analyzed and described using trance theory.

The general trance inducing aspect of music is well-known, but trance theory helps to specifically identify those aspects of music which induce trance, and lays the foundation for describing the nature of the specific trance.

Why should we want to do this? One reason is so that we can engineer better trances through music. There is a part of any music that does induce trance. Sometimes it is only the trance inducing aspect of music which many people feel is what makes music successful or not.

Why is this? Because people get pleasure when they are in a trance. Therefore, if you can make better trances through music, then people will like your music. So, it comes down to trance engineering. But to do that, you have to have a practical model for trance. You got that. Now all you need to do is apply the model.

'Pure' trance inducing music is simple to produce. All that is needed is at least three or four (or more) individually engaging rhythms. Some kinds of reggae music does this, so do the canons of J.S.Bach. In much so-called generic trance music only two rhythms are used, and only occasionally three. The 'engaging' aspect of trance inducing rhythms is important. What may be 'engaging' to one person may be repulsive to someone else. Repeating rhythms can be perceived as 'boring' but it is precisely this 'boring' aspect which is the precursor to trance. If a rhythm is 'engaging' and not boring, then trance is certain to occur. How to make a rhythm engaging is implied by trance theory.

One important characteristic of successful trance inducing music is what trance theory would call 'modulating the dissociated trance plane'. The music of shamans and many aboriginal tribes create effective music which modulates the dissociated trance plane by slightly varying the underlying trance generating loop. Several good examples of this can be heard in the CD 'Heart of the Forest' The music of the Baka Forest People of Southeast Cameroon. Several good examples can also be heard in Glen Velez's Assyrian Rose. el-HADRA: the Mystik Dance has some good attempts at creating the dissociated trance plane, but fails to exploit the opportunities to skillfully modulate it.

There are many nature sounds, such as birds, frogs, crickets which fundamentally repeat, but which contain slight variations within each repetition. The fundamental repetition is the trance generating loop (TGL) and the variations in each repetition results in the modulation of the dissociated trance plane. It is for this reason that the sounds of nature tend to produce trance. The type of variations within the TGL determine to a great degree the effectiveness and depth of the trance.

When there is some 'subtilty' or artistry in the creation and modulation of the DTP, then the trance is compelling and there is an increase in the trance force.

The trance force is a measure of the strength of a trance in units called a 'wyrd'. Without going into too much technical detail here if some assumptions are made and results simplified, the wyrd is proportional to the log of the number of repetitions of a loop and inversely related to the number of elements in a loop. Wyrds are additive, so the trance force increases with more than one loop. The range of values of the wyrd are pretty much what you would expect in a musical setting.

A loud, heavy beat is not necessary. Loudness or heavyness is not of itself productive of trance.

Repetition produces trance. But it will be the type of repetition which is 'engaging' or which produces an involvement with the inner reality. In some trance music - such as goa - there are multiple loops, some of which are subtle. Subtle loops tend to bring the attention to a finer focus. The resulting splitting or dissociation results in trance. But that is not the whole story. What 'subtle' is to one person may be different for another. The effect - which is to say, which cognitive functions are disabled - is another story. Again, this can vary between persons listening to the same music. Another consideration is the order in which cognitive functions are disabled, and finally, what additional processes are being encouraged when these cognitive functions are disabled. In other words, how is this state of mind being used?

Dissonance is also not necessary; although loud heavy beats and dissonance may be interesting from aesthetic points of view, they will not produce trances over which there is much control.

Complex rhythms are not necessarily productive of deeper trances. Deeper trances are more easily produced when, after some time of engaging rhythms, there are increasingly more subtile rhythm or melodic changes, or if rhythm loops become longer and longer. The point is that the rhythms or melodic sequences become more subtile and more engaging. Avoid sharp or unsettling rhythmic or melodic changes as these will most likely terminate the trance by destroying the trance generating loop resulting in the collapse of the dissociated trance plane. One of the reasons that 'trance music' works to produce trance is that there are long periods of the same loop or loops. The long repetitions add to the wyrd logarithmically. This is generally not enough, so secondary loops are invariably added to increase the wyrd and make the music successful as a trance producer.

At the point that a deep trance is produced, subliminal messages could be introduced with effectiveness. The content of the suggestions should be carefully crafted to empower. Suggestions will also affect the music producer.

Most instances of trance music do not allow sufficient time for deeper trances to develop, as complexities are introduced too quickly. Remember, in shamanistic trances, drumming would go on for days. Subtile changes in the rhythm and melodic structures over time will produce deep trances because it is the 'subtilty' which is engaging. Commercial trance music should continue for a minimum of 20 minutes to induce deep trance. Perhaps we are all fortunate that such long trance music riffs almost never happen.

Trance theory mentions secondary trance loops and multiple dissociated trance planes. I can show you how this has a musical equivalent. It is possible to produce schizophrenic-like behavior from music alone. You don't want to do that, right?

It is also possible to produce 'addictive trance music'. Jeez! Why would anyone want to do that?

Additional research in the application of trance theory to music as well as to other arts which produce trance and trance-like effects is needed.

Goa, drum & bass, acid trance music are all fascinating examples of trance inducing music. Obviously, some are more successful than others. Some DJs as well seem to be better at producing trance than others. Again, I can recommend that you apply trance theory to music making in order to create more and deeper trances. It can be done with music alone - no words!

One interesting (and new) aspect of trance music is the possibility to control and create music using Perl and MIDI interfaces. A repeating musical loop is relatively easy to program, and it is quite obvious that a loop is being programmed. If you compare acoustic music with computer generated music, the loops often are not obvious from reading the musical score; but in a computer program they are more obvious (to me).

I once thought that it would be interesting to create computer instrumentation which could analyze acoustic music, find the loops and count them. I realize that such an undertaking is not simple.

What is simpler is to do it the other way: create the music with programs so that the loops can be precisely controlled. There may even be measures which can be made on such programs.

One research project would be to find correllations between various measures on such created music and the subjective effects.

Such musical research projects are intended to become part of the activity encouraged by The Trance Institute. If you are a musician interested in this subject, please get in touch with me!

If you want to recommend web sites or musical CDs, tapes, albums in the contemporary trance music genres, or would like to see those recommendations, please send me your recommendation.

Want more information about trance music, or critiques on your music from a trance theory point of view? Send your tape or CD to me with your email address and I'll give you a detailed evaluation and critique. For now, no charge, unless I get bombarded with too much.

Trance theory is rich; it is full of important implications. Not only does it explain the trances of the past, it can help us to analyze the trances of the present and design trances of the future.

I am very interested in working with serious minded people who wish to use trance theory in scientific or in personal research. I invite you to contact me personally with your questions and proposals.

References:

*

Wier, Dennis R., Trance: from magic to technology. Ann Arbor, Michigan: Trans Media, 1996.

*

About the Author:

Dennis R. Wier is the Director of The Trance Institute in Switzerland. He may be reached by email at Email contact See also www.trance.edu
*

The Book: Trance: from magic to technology How and where to get it.

General References (various sources)

1. *85-1107. Rouget, Gilbert. [Musique et la transe. English] Music and trance: a theory of the relations between music and possession. Gilbert Rouget - translation from the French revised by Brunhilde Biebuyck in collaboration with the author. Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 1985 . xix, 395 p.: ill. 24 cm.— LC CALL NUMBER: ML3920 .R813 1985
2. *92-46586: Sansonese, J. Nigro. The body of myth: mythology, shamanic trance, and the sacred geography of the body. Rochester, Vt.: Inner Traditions: Distributed to the book trade in the U.S. by International Distribution Corp., c1994. p. cm.— LC CALL NUMBER: BL313 .S326 1994
3. *95-169033: Shamans and cultures. Budapest: Akademiai Kiado / Los Angeles: International Society for Trans-Oceanic Research, 1993. xi, 301 p. : ill. 24 cm.— LC CALL NUMBER: GN475.8 .S47 1993
4. * ocm27-490807: Siikala, Anna-Leena. Studies on shamanism/ Helsinki: Finnish Anthropological Society / Budapest: Akademiai Kiado, 1992. 230 p.: ill. 24 cm.— LC CALL NUMBER: BL 2370 S5S66 1992
5. *93-246913. Thorpe, S. A. Shamans, medicine men and traditional healers: a comparative study of shamanism in Siberian Asia, Southern Africa and North America. S.A. Thorpe. 1st ed. Pretoria: University of South Africa, 1993. 146 p. 22 cm.— LC CALL NUMBER: BL2370.S5 T48 1993
6. *86-31810: Villoldo, Alberto. Healing states. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1987. xvi, 207 p., [8] p. of plates: ill. 21 cm.— LC CALL NUMBER: RZ400 .V5 1987
7. *94-72921: Vitebsky, Piers. The shaman. 1st American ed. Boston: Little, Brown, c1995. 184 p.: ill. (some col.) 21 cm.— LC CALL NUMBER: GN475.8 .V57 1995
8. *89-48642: Walsh, Roger N. The spirit of shamanism. Los Angeles: J.P. Tarcher, 1990. p. cm.— LC CALL NUMBER: BL2370.S5.W35
9. Witchcraft and sorcery of the American native peoples / edited by Deward E. Walker, Jr. - preface by David Carrasco. Moscow, Idaho : University of Idaho Press, c1989. xi, 346 p.: ill., maps, 26 cm.— LC CALL NUMBER: E59.R38 W58 1989
10. Amadou Hampate Ba, The Life and Teachings of Tierno Bokar, published in French by Editions du Seuil, 1980, Paris; English translation excerpted in Material for Thought no. 12, Far West Editions, 1990, San Francisco. A record of an islamic African traditional oral spiritual teaching.
11. Paul F. Berliner, The Soul of Mbira, Univ. of Calif. Press, 1978, Berkeley. An in-depth study of Mbira musicianship and its cultural context among the Shona people. The Mbira is sometimes called the “thumb pianoâ€

 

itchytriggerniggerfingers
Posts: 2288
Joined: Wed May 17, 2006 9:39 pm


^^ definitely in a trance now :lol:

 

psythagoras
Posts: 177
Joined: Sat May 08, 2004 12:01 pm


Raptor wrote :
...Subtile changes in the rhythm and melodic structures over time will produce deep trances because it is the 'subtilty' which is engaging. Commercial trance music should continue for a minimum of 20 minutes to induce deep trance. Perhaps we are all fortunate that such long trance music riffs almost never happen....


I would prefer that 20 minutes riffs were the standard.

If a trance riff is good enough to produce and good enough to be played by a trance dj it should be good enough to be listened to by a trance crowd for a trance inducing length of time. Shouldn't it?

Bring on the 20 minute trance riffs with 'subtle' changes...GO PROGRESSIVE!!!

 

kathmandu
Posts: 921
Joined: Wed Nov 06, 2002 12:05 pm


I think Damien is just waiting for the Hallucinogen 3rd album...

 

simon
Posts: 2944
Joined: Fri Dec 28, 2001 8:33 pm


lui, i think you've missed the point. What supposedly differentiates the music we listen to from normal club trance (ala tiesto and ministry of sound) is that it is *psychedelic*. its this part of the music that is getting hard to find.


but anyways, in what you quoted, it proves the point:
'Pure' trance inducing music is simple to produce. All that is needed is at least three or four (or more) individually engaging rhythms. Some kinds of reggae music does this, so do the canons of J.S.Bach. In much so-called generic trance music only two rhythms are used, and only occasionally three. The 'engaging' aspect of trance inducing rhythms is important. What may be 'engaging' to one person may be repulsive to someone else. Repeating rhythms can be perceived as 'boring' but it is precisely this 'boring' aspect which is the precursor to trance. If a rhythm is 'engaging' and not boring, then trance is certain to occur. How to make a rhythm engaging is implied by trance theory.


good psytrance has so many layers of rhythms you cant hear it all in a couple of listens, plus it has psychedelic melodies (and more than two layers of this). this stuff is rare thesedays. but it is still around.

 

raptor
Posts: 1483
Joined: Wed Dec 26, 2001 4:51 am


simon wrote :
lui, i think you've missed the point. What supposedly differentiates the music we listen to from normal club trance (ala tiesto and ministry of sound) is that it is *psychedelic*. its this part of the music that is getting hard to find.


but anyways, in what you quoted, it proves the point:
'Pure' trance inducing music is simple to produce. All that is needed is at least three or four (or more) individually engaging rhythms. Some kinds of reggae music does this, so do the canons of J.S.Bach. In much so-called generic trance music only two rhythms are used, and only occasionally three. The 'engaging' aspect of trance inducing rhythms is important. What may be 'engaging' to one person may be repulsive to someone else. Repeating rhythms can be perceived as 'boring' but it is precisely this 'boring' aspect which is the precursor to trance. If a rhythm is 'engaging' and not boring, then trance is certain to occur. How to make a rhythm engaging is implied by trance theory.


good psytrance has so many layers of rhythms you cant hear it all in a couple of listens, plus it has psychedelic melodies (and more than two layers of this). this stuff is rare thesedays. but it is still around.


I put up this article as I thought the authors take on trance (psychedelic or otherwise) was interesting.



the word 'psychedelic ' comes from 2 greek words "mind"(psyche) and "manifest" (delos) so if something is psychedelic or not will always be derived from the listners interpretation and experience of it. What then defines this interpretation is usually how much exposure to the form of music in question aswell as other forms of music the listener has had over his or her life including their expectations of what is experienced (let alone the setting, mind-altering substance, thier level of open-mindedness and own personal development etc).

This is just my opinion of course, but I think alot of newer people to the music are having psychedelic experiences with the alot of the music, and not to all, that has been released over the last couple of years. What I also see alot of is that some of more experienced people of the scene dont allow this to even be a possibility astheiropinion and interpretation of the music has done something that is inevitable - changed

Maybe we should just call the music 'trance' so that it doesnt give off any misconceptions or expectations as what is psychedelic is a personal thing... at least we can all agree that the music we listen to at 'doofs' induces a trance state of some sort.. right? If the listener has a psychedelic experience from it - great! If they dont and their having fun then thats ok to... i think.

 

Pure__Ignorance
Posts: 198
Joined: Wed Jun 27, 2007 3:21 pm


I'm not sure what my thoughts are worth in this argument, I'm pretty new to psytrance and haven't heard much psy, let alone much goa or acid trance etc. But to say if psy will soon be/is dead, then we should look at what is Good PsyTrance.

This leads me to make three points ( I'm just guessing it will be three, I haven't really thought of them yet)

1. If it's trance, then it's Psychadelic , kinda like raptor said. If there's a INStitute of trance, then this can only improve as people learn more ?

2. If it's Psy Trance then it's even more psychadelic, on account of how the trance is induced and manipulated to heighten the psychadelic aspects of the experience. Just like Jimmy Hendrix and Jim Morrison did with their rock music. They're gone, But after them came Frank Zappa and PiNK FloyD with thier trippt shit, so Psychadealia probably won't die either.

3. um...

Hey, Psy Trance is cool. But people won't listen until they're ready to hear it. If that pushes good producers into more mainstream markets, then other people will just have to step up and make it.

So what are you waiting for? (me, I've got excuses man, I have. And they're good ones.)

 

raptor
Posts: 1483
Joined: Wed Dec 26, 2001 4:51 am


Its not an arguement (yet! lol).. its actually quite constructive so far!

 

SYNeR
Posts: 346
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2006 12:07 am


Personally, I find the older stuff to have more melody & sound more trippy.
The newer stuff to me, particularly dark psy, which is my favourite (when done properly), seems to go for sounds that try to come across trippy but instead come across almost as a bunch of noise (to my ears at least).

Some weird/crazy noise is okay - but when there's no structure to it, and it's just chaotic sounding noise, it may come across as psychedelic but definitely not as trance, IMO... One of the perfect contrasts to this I have found is listening to a couple of different tech trance albums/samples that simon has recommended previously.. Really nice, deep & moody music.

Then again, as I've mentioned, I'm finding it hard to find newer good music (I wouldn't even know where to start, besides checking out labels that have previously released good stuff) - so yea, maybe I'm just shit at looking and I keep coming up with shit releases instead of the gems :roll: .. Having said that, as a relatively new comer to psy, out of the older and newer releases I've checked out, there's definitely a higher percentage of tracks I prefer in the older stuff.

I don't think think it's a matter of my tastes changing a whole lot either. I kind of got to experience both older and newer music at the same time and I keep going back to the older releases. The direction(s) that a lot of newer music seems to be going in is not really to my liking, unfortunately :(

Occasionally I'll hear an album that I like a few tracks on, or even an album that I think is worth it just for 1 (really) good track - but not too often.. so feel free to point me in the right direction in case I've sort of been walking in the dark and 'stumbling' upon crappy releases :wink:

Basically I like well structured, trippy music that (excuse the cliche) almost has a journey to it & music that actually has substance.

I should probably get out the ol' rusty shovel and start digging deeper into album release land.
70 posts Page 1 of 3

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 8 guests