Codex Alimentarius

Current Events, World Discussion, Opinions etc
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ATREYU
Posts: 1190
Joined: Thu May 09, 2002 2:07 pm


Codex Alimentarius Lecture by Ian R. Crane

Never heard of Codex Alimentarius? That's exactly what they want!

The UN plan to eradicate organic farming & to destroy the Natural Health Industry.

With biting political analysis, Ian R. Crane probes the track record of those who openly crave the introduction of a One World hierarchical Government. He exposes the agenda of those who have presided over events leading directly to the launching of the illegal wars in Afghanistan & Iraq and who continually demonstrate their desire to perpetuate a state of permanent global conflict; whilst systematically eroding personal freedom, through the process of gradualism.

#1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O2D4-noTiCg
#2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K7iKLXUgjlQ
#3: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ij8aF70S-nI
#4: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IsDiNywnnNE
#5: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W0ofAvvr9LY
#6: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XiuvIwpm6ec
#7: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=snT2LdzE5uU
#8: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zwrr5kKC9Nc
#9: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l2mcjlkAavM
:shock:


More:
http://www.livingnutrition.com/articles/codex.html

("Official" Site)- http://www.codexalimentarius.net/web/index_en.jsp

Time to start that vegie patch.

 

infinafta
Posts: 4100
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2002 1:19 pm


Foolish Atreyu.

This 'Vegie Patch', as you call it, is no match for our Satanic Masonic Zionist-Communist New World Order!

We will crush you and your kind with our randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind studies and there is nothing you can do about it, Slave.

Bwahahaha!!!


BWAHAHAHAHAHAAAA!!!

 

ATREYU
Posts: 1190
Joined: Thu May 09, 2002 2:07 pm


Your such a boring Snob Boris.

 

infinafta
Posts: 4100
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2002 1:19 pm


ATREYU wrote :
Your such a boring Snob Boris.



For the love of Baphomet.

"YOU'RE"

 

simon
Posts: 2944
Joined: Fri Dec 28, 2001 8:33 pm


to put it simply, the codex is limp in australia due to our laws being even tougher than the codex.


wooohoo!

 

SamuraiJack
Posts: 10043
Joined: Thu Aug 22, 2002 11:56 am


infinafta wrote :
Foolish Atreyu.

This 'Vegie Patch', as you call it, is no match for our Satanic Masonic Zionist-Communist New World Order!

We will crush you and your kind with our randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind studies and there is nothing you can do about it, Slave.

Bwahahaha!!!


BWAHAHAHAHAHAAAA!!!


You're quite wrong. When the hooves of my Mangudai troops resound throughout George Street, Atreyu will be kept alive and in comfort, so that he may be brought out once in a while to try his light bringer powers on fully nano-tech armoured augmented troops so they can have a good laugh after fighting against the alien swarm.

"I have my light powers! Halp! The tsunami has released negatively charged waters all overz the worldz! Halp! Wait, aren't negative ions good? Either way, halp! Light force workers unite! CHOO CHOO CHOO! PEW PEW WITH THE LIGHT POWERS!"

Then one day, they'll kill him.

Anyway, picking on Atreyu is a little bit mean don't you think Infinata?

I mean, it's like punching a downie in the face, sure it's funny the first thousand or so times, but after a while you just start to notice their sad faces and think "Poor dumb bastards. They really can't help it."

So, Atreyu has a slight reality problem. You might call him, reality challenged.

No need to pick on the poor bastard, it's too easy anyway.

 

infinafta
Posts: 4100
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2002 1:19 pm


Yeah, so anyway.

Teh Stupid would really work so much better if it was distilled into 'tard-sized pieces that even a Socialist can understand. Who has time to sit through 10 youtube videos when there are workers to be united?

Here's one I prepared earlier:

Image

See.

Simple. Effective. Crazy.

Perfect.

 

SamuraiJack
Posts: 10043
Joined: Thu Aug 22, 2002 11:56 am


My favourtie part was the spelling errors.

But this isn't really as good as the ice cream one though.

 

Mr Fuck the Third
Posts: 13
Joined: Thu Jul 31, 2008 8:38 pm


mR fUCK LiKE tHE pART ABoUT fROZEN tURDS

 

tract
Posts: 3661
Joined: Sat Oct 12, 2002 6:45 pm


I lol'd.

INSHALLAH!

 

Dr. Scientist
Posts: 1910
Joined: Fri Aug 05, 2005 6:24 pm


codex is the real deal!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Its fun to pretend though.


Look it up, the UN has an official page with the guidelines. VITAMINS and PROTEIN from december 2009 will be considered toxins, but, sodium flouride is classified as a dietary supplement. WAKE UP. THERE IS A WHOLE WORLD OUTSIDE OF YOUR OPINION.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Then again if population reduction isnt your thing......

I work at flemington mafkets, I see it happening already. protein levels are dropping as monsanto buy out more growers. Stick to the official page its scary enough with the conspiracy stuff.

 

tripn
Posts: 6721
Joined: Mon Aug 05, 2002 5:28 pm


Dr. Scientist wrote :
Look it up, the UN has an official page with the guidelines. VITAMINS and PROTEIN from december 2009 will be considered toxins,


huh?

 

SamuraiJack
Posts: 10043
Joined: Thu Aug 22, 2002 11:56 am


tripn wrote :
Dr. Scientist wrote :
Look it up, the UN has an official page with the guidelines. VITAMINS and PROTEIN from december 2009 will be considered toxins,


huh?


He's not actually as crazy as he sounds, even though he sounds plenty fucking crazy.

It's already becoming difficult to get Vitamin C in it's pure powdered form, as Vitamin C is one of the best ways to self medicate.

Similar with the food. GM and selectively bred crops often end up looking better...bigger, brighter, whatever, but oddly enough quite lacking in essential nutrients.

Fucking bastards.

Anyway a populace with borderline malnutrition is easier to control. Duh.

 

tripn
Posts: 6721
Joined: Mon Aug 05, 2002 5:28 pm


SamuraiJack wrote :

Anyway a populace with borderline malnutrition is easier to control. Duh.


not to mention more profitable for drug companies who have extensive lobbying power over governments.

 

silly the kid
Posts: 555
Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2004 4:26 pm


Anyone here know much about raw food diets? As the name suggests this means eating only raw food and non-treated dairy...

A few people I know who have started on this one say it is quite amazing so far (a few months in). One said the improvement in his energy is so marked it is like day and night (and he was in pretty good condition already):

http://www.wewant2live.com/

 

The Journey Man Project
Posts: 1195
Joined: Thu Jul 20, 2006 1:46 pm


Yes a mate of mine at work tried it and ended up with his inside so rotted from bugs and disease he spent another 6 motnhs in and out of hospital be treated for it... in the end the infection in his gut got so bad he shat out some of the lining of his stomach and is now permanently on a liquid diet for the rest of his life... seeing as he is only 23 that kinds sucks... I'd stick to eating normal food... diets are for idiots who just can;t be fucked exercising hard. If you work out regularly and hard, you can eat whatever the fuck you want.

 

silly the kid
Posts: 555
Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2004 4:26 pm


hectic! poor guy.

was he following Vonderplanitz's system? That's the one that has been recommended to me.

 

tripn
Posts: 6721
Joined: Mon Aug 05, 2002 5:28 pm


why the hell would anyone want to eat only raw food? apart from salmon and other certain types of fish everything else tastes so much better when cooked.

 

silly the kid
Posts: 555
Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2004 4:26 pm


cos it makes them feel better.

there is a reasonable sounding theory behind this guy`s system, `The primal diet`, from what I have read so far. it is contradictory to the medical model so obviously will be controversial to many. I can't claim to know the science in any detail so if anyone does...fire away.

the times Ive had raw red meat and eggs at Japanese restaurants I was surprised how similar it tasted to cooked red meat and egg.

 

The Journey Man Project
Posts: 1195
Joined: Thu Jul 20, 2006 1:46 pm


I don't mind raw red meat when it is prepared under the right circumstances, but science has proven time and time again that raw egg contains a huge does of extremely unhealthy bacteria and should not be consumed at all... not sure about what diet my mate was on, wil ask him next time we hook up... I guess food is an idnividual thing, like all tastes, inc. music and woman :wink:

 

FeralBrown
Posts: 5944
Joined: Wed Aug 28, 2002 2:26 pm


^Actually, aside from a slight potential for salmonella (only a risk if chooks are sickly or not well maintained- I read that the statistic of a salmonella-carrying egg is around 1:30000), the only health risk associated with raw eggs is if your immune system is shithouse.
There are so many recipes for pates, dips, salad dressings, drinks etc. which call for raw eggs that it's clearly not a serious issue.

Also, about the raw diet- while I don't follow a structured diet, the bulk of my diet is centered raw foods, and, while I haven't compared it to anything, when I do stuff with friends I can definitely notice a considerable difference in stamina etc. compared to most... (I have a pretty physically taxing, active lifestyle, too, though) I think the idea is also that if you're not cooking food, it should be as fresh as possible to reduce bacterial infections etc.

You might find this interesting, too:
Cooking with hominids

Journalist Dr Peter Lavelle from ABC Health Online in Sydney discusses the evolution of food and the history of cooking.


This transcript was typed from a recording of the program. The ABC cannot guarantee its complete accuracy because of the possibility of mishearing and occasional difficulty in identifying speakers.

Robyn Williams: Have you ever considered trying a chimpanzee breakfast? Richard Wrangham has. Mind you, he didn't enjoy it very much. Now I imagined that chimps would reach languidly for any ripe fruit hanging within arm's length and then gobble the luscious treat.

Well that's not what Wrangham found. He's professor of anthropology at Harvard, and he gave himself a basic chimpanzee diet over a number of days and couldn't wait until it was over. The food was gritty, hard to chew, as fibrous as old rope and, if you do eat ants, they sting.

So consider yourself lucky to have been born in the age of the modern kitchen and the delights of cooking. Dr Peter Lavelle is here to tell you why. Peter writes on health matters at ABC Online.

Peter Lavelle: Cooking is a uniquely human activity. Name one other species that gathers around a barbecue on a Saturday afternoon, grilling sausages until they're almost black, while gulping down mouthfuls of fermented hops. You can't, can you?

Yet, even amongst hominids, the ancestors of modern man, cooking is a recent phenomenon. For millions of years, the diet was raw. Raw plants, nuts and wild grains with slabs of raw meat from wildebeest, antelope and other quarry and only on those days when the hunt went well.

But somewhere between one and two million years ago, hominids discovered that adding heat changed the chemical composition of the food.

How they made this discovery is a mystery. Perhaps they stumbled on the roasted flesh of an animal trapped and killed in a forest fire. They then worked out how to suspend the flesh on a spit over a fire, turning it to make sure it cooked evenly.

The first bread was possibly a crude paste made by mixing water with the cracked kernels of wild grasses and toasting it on a hot stone.

They could heat water in shells, skulls, or a hollowed stone, adding roots and grasses and perhaps last night's leftover bone marrow to make the first soup.

Whatever technique they used, the effect was the same. What cooking did was to break food down and make it easier to chew and digest. It broke down proteins in meats, making it easier to chew and absorb in the gut. It turned tough, indigestible starches and collagen into soft, easily digested gelatin and sugars.

But cooking didn't just soften food and make it more digestible. It dramatically expanded the range of flavours available to the human palate. The process of cooking releases thousands of chemicals that interact with human taste buds and smell receptors. Carbohydrates are broken down into sweet tasting sugars. Proteins are broken down into amino acids, which react with the sugars, forming tasty new molecules.

It also meant the same amount of food suddenly yielded a lot more calories. And it might have been one reason why our brain size roughly tripled between about one and two million years ago. Now that we had more calories in the diet, our brain, which needs more calories than any other organ, could expand in size. Most of the expansion was in the cerebral cortex, that part of our brain responsible for thinking and planning ahead. So by making possible other advances -- speech, language and writing -- cooking may have paved the way for human civilisation.

The discerning hominid could enjoy thousands more flavours, and with its recently enlarged brain size, the ability to experiment with and devise new combinations of foods.

Sophisticated cooking first appeared in the lush plains of the fertile crescent in Mesopotamia. The earliest known cookbook consisted of three clay tablets dating from 1700 BC from Mesopotamia, written in Sumerian, featuring recipes for gazelle stew and partridge pie, garnished with stewed turnips.

Unlike other creatures on earth, most of whom who have a simple, specialised, repetitive diet, the diet of humans quickly became remarkably varied. Meats, fishes, game, poultry, vegetables, legumes, fruits, dairy products -- all stewed, baked, braised, fried and garnished with sauces, flavoured with spices.

It drove civilisations to open up trading routes and cross vast oceans. People went in search of exotic foods and flavourings from distant places. Spices from India and the Far East, exotic new vegetables like potatoes, tomatoes, beans from the New World.

But the actual cooking of the food itself was always a localised activity. Every region had a local marketplace where the food was bought, taken back to the house and cooked there. And that was the problem with food. You could only cook with what was available at the time, and you had to cook it and eat it then and there. Each meal had to be prepared on the spot, at meal times, by a cook familiar with the recipe.

But that changed at the end of the second millennium AD. In 1923, to be exact. An American, Clarence Birdseye, invented a system of flash-freezing foods under high pressure. Now, fish, meat, and vegetables could be thawed and cooked and tasted just as good as if they were fresh. By the 1950s, food was being packed, frozen, canned, dehydrated, and preserved. It was easy to prepare -- just thaw and heat -- and it was convenient. Suburban housewives crammed it into the refrigerators that flourished in suburban homes in the years after World War II.

To keep their families happy, flavourists employed by the food companies, working in laboratories, created thousands of new flavours in the lab, and new consistencies and textures. Now, food was tasty and convenient, and cheap. Much cheaper than fresh food. Food could be bought in bulk from farms that were tripling their output using new crop strains and automated farming techniques -- and manufactured with cheap bulk ingredients like starches, fats, sugars, salt and corn syrup using mass production, free of the vagaries of climate, poor soil and crop disease.

Suddenly, cooking was no longer in the hands of the cook or the chef, but the engineers, and chemists and the retailers, the supermarkets.

The real ingredients were no longer the soil, the sun and the air that allowed the farmer to grow the produce, but the petrochemicals from below the surface of the earth that powered the factories and transported the food from farmer to supermarket shelf.

Today, 90% of the household food budget goes on food that's been processed. There are 45,000 food products on the shelves and freezers of the average supermarket. There are 10,000 new food products joining them every year.

Thanks to the food industry -- let's give it a new name, the culinary industrial complex -- we can eat as much as we want, when we want. If we want more, we can have it. And we do, even if we're not really hungry. We eat bigger servings, more often. We don't seem to be able to help ourselves.

In fact, scientists think that we might be genetically programmed to over-eat. For most of our history we've lived in conditions of near famine, so when food came along, we ate as much as we could, storing the excess as body fat to use when food was scarce. We developed taste buds and smell receptors to tell us what food was good -- sweet foods were high in energy, salty foods were rich in essential minerals.

In the 21st century, we have that same genetic make up and those same taste buds. But today there's no shortage of food in the developed world. It's tastier, sweeter, saltier than it ever was when that first side of antelope was strung up over the fire.

Our metabolism, accustomed to a primitive diet of tubers, fruits and wild grasses with occasional meat, is being flooded with raw sugars, fat, and salt. More and more of it. A third of us are obese, two-thirds overweight. On average, we're increasing our weight by between 500 grams to a kilo each year.

It's clogging up our arteries, choking off the blood supply to our organs. It disrupts the functioning of our cells, causing DNA to mutate and form cancers. The extra weight destroys our weight-bearing joints. Lifestyle diseases -- diabetes, heart disease and stroke -- are now our biggest killers.

Doctors, nutritionists and other health professionals are saying, 'Enough'. We've got to get back to something like the diet our hominid ancestors ate -- a diet of grains, fruits and vegetables, low in fats and sugars, with a limit to how much meat we eat, or risk dying at a younger age than our parents' generation.

And the message is spawning grassroots organisations like the Slow Food Movement, which began in Italy in 1986 promoting local cuisines and fresh food from small local growers, and is now active in over 100 countries.

But for organisations like Slow Food, time may be running out.

Prices for fresh food are rising steeply. Crops are failing because of water shortages, driving up prices. Land that was once used for agriculture is being given over to housing and to production of biofuels, making less land available for farming. At the same time, demand for meat is rising in the developing world, especially in India and China, as the newly affluent populations say to each other, 'Hey, let's eat Western tonight.'

Food shortages hit the world's poor hardest, because they spend proportionally more of their incomes on food. But eventually wealthy Westerners too may find that that 400-gram T-bone steak is getting harder and harder to come by.

Slowly but surely, the world's temperate zones will turn to desert, says James Lovelock, in his book, The Revenge of Gaia. The cattle stations of Australia and Argentina, the rice fields of Asia, the corn and wheat belts of the United States and South America, and the farms of Europe will be gone by the end of the century. The major ocean fisheries will go too, if not fished out, then bleached of life by rising sea temperatures. Much of the world's population will face starvation, says Lovelock.

We could improve the yields of our crops by using genetically modified strains that produce more plants, using less water and fewer nutrients. But even genetically modified crops need soil and water.

If we want to avoid starvation, our only hope is to do away with agriculture altogether, and synthesise our food, says Lovelock.

He predicts that in the future meat won't come from animals, and vegetables won't come from plants. They'll be cultured instead in giant vats, from amino acids and sugars, assembled in turn from the basic elements from the air, water and from petrochemical waste.

All the nutrients we need, with added vitamins and minerals, in fact healthier even than natural foods, because they could be manufactured to fight disease. Nano robots present in the foods could circulate through the blood system, cleaning out fat deposits and killing germs and cancer cells.

And if you're a picky eater, don't worry. Food companies like Kraft and Nestle are already working on 'smart' foods that interact with consumers to 'personalise' food. You could change the flavour, colour, texture, and nutrient content according to your tastes.

There'll always be those self-styled gourmands with their dusty old copies of The Joy of Cooking, who talk about the great chefs of the 20th century -- chefs with names like Nigella and Jamie and Stephanie. They'll gather under cover of darkness and fry and braise and bake and stew the produce from their tiny, inefficient garden plots.

But these people are swimming against the tide. Why won't they accept progress? After all, the early hominids must have thought it was unnatural to burn meat in a fire, at first. Till they tasted it.

It's what makes us human. Imagine, on a Saturday afternoon, in the year 2050, feasting on hot little cylinders of cultured protein with the flavour of burnt meat and barbecue sauce. Name me one other species that could reproduce the authentic flavours of a barbecue. You can't can you?

Robyn Williams: Well there is ET in a sexist apron standing by a fry-up on Planet Zogg. But I don't think that's what you meant, Peter.

Dr Peter Lavelle is at ABC Online, dealing with health matters. And you can, by the way, hear Richard Wrangham of Harvard, talk all about the chimp diet and the discovery of cooking by catching In Conversation this Thursday week, that's in two weeks' time, at 7.30pm after the Movies on ABC Radio National.

 

SamuraiJack
Posts: 10043
Joined: Thu Aug 22, 2002 11:56 am


Whatever fuckheads. I smoke a pack a day and eat both raw and cooked steak.

I still bet I can outenergy you hippy cunts any day of the week and twice on sundays or days ending in 'y'.

 

FeralBrown
Posts: 5944
Joined: Wed Aug 28, 2002 2:26 pm


Maybe... but I'm pretty good these days!

 

silly the kid
Posts: 555
Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2004 4:26 pm


well I'm gonna read up some more and try it and see for myself.

 

SamuraiJack
Posts: 10043
Joined: Thu Aug 22, 2002 11:56 am


FeralBrown wrote :
Maybe... but I'm pretty good these days!


So?
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